Orologio

About

In 1969, Notre Dame made a bold move to require all its undergraduate architecture students to spend their third year in Rome as part of the Rome Studies Program. Directors believed the Eternal City offered students an opportunity to immerse in the classical and vernacular urban architecture which are foci of the five-year program. Fifty years later, architecture students are still residing, sketching, and studying in Rome each year. Since 2001, other undergraduates have joined them. For those students, there has been no shortage of places to explore, Papal Masses to attend, or service opportunities to join. Undergraduates from all of Notre Dame’s colleges and courses of study are invited to study in Rome.

The Rome Global Gateway officially opened in 2014 after construction was complete on the beautiful Via Ostilia. Two years later, NDI and the Rome Global Gateway launched the Rome International Scholars Program which is open to motivated undergraduates interested in independent research, internships, or service, in addition to Italian language courses. For graduate students and faculty, there are dozens of seminars, lectures, and events hosted at the Rome Global Gateway, in addition to a lengthy list of partner research institutions, libraries, and archives, whose doors are open to Notre Dame scholars.

Notre Dame’s Rome Global Gateway is made up of two facilities. The research, teaching, and learning facility in Via Ostilia is located just two blocks away from the residential living-learning community, Notre Dame’s Villa on the Celio. Inaugurated in the fall of 2017, Notre Dame’s Villa on the Celio brings together undergraduate Notre Dame students from across the arts and sciences that have a shared interest in expanding their academic and cultural horizons through study in Rome. The Gateway's location is in the heart of Rome, just steps from the Colosseum, yet it remains peaceful and quiet. The neighborhood is speckled with Roman monuments and centuries-old churches, but it remains lively and mainly inhabited by Romans, rather than tourists, but does offer a selection of hotels. From the Rome Global Gateway, the rest of the city is but a short walk away.

If you have questions or would like to visit us at the Rome Global Gateway, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

 

  • 1969 The Rome Studies Program is established by architect Frank Montana
  • 2007 The Hesburgh Library began cataloging the library collection as part of the University architecture library
  • 2010 Notre Dame purchases a building on Via Ostilia and begins renovations
  • 2017 Students move into the Villa on the Celio, a new student residence owned by Notre Dame
  • 2019 Architecture alumni and friends will gather in Rome to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Rome Studies Program
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